Jomar’s new approach to discount shopping

Check out this great story from 6ABC’s Action News Team about our client, Jomar! We recently helped the local discount chain with a brand makeover, but you can still find the same great deals in-store. The Action News story will tell you about some of the wonderful treasures you can find at Jomar. The chain is now connecting with customers in fun, new ways. Check out Jomar online and visit the store’s Facebook Page and Twitter Handle.

Read full story on abclocal.go.com.

A nun walks into an ad agency

…that was right after she marched into City Hall and then the Philadelphia Streets department, looking for the people responsible for the UnLitter Us campaign. Ok, I dramatize. Sister Anne hardly marches about, but rather strides with quiet purpose. And when I met with her, she was on a mission.

The diminutive Sister Anne teaches an art class at the John Kennedy Mental Health Center on Broad Street. Every Monday, she takes the subway from her convent in West Philadelphia to her subway stop at City Hall, where she is greeted by the dramatic faces of our campaign. With close to 100 posters lining the tracks and walkways underground, they were hard to miss this summer. Sister Anne’s voice is delicate as she describes standing on the platform surrounded by the expressive words and faces of our poets, marveling that we chose to fight filth with beauty. Sister Anne not only felt the soul of UnLitter Us, she was intellectually curious about the strategy we chose. She thought that by understanding the thinking behind the campaign, she could better help her students. Ultimately, the Center helps to rebuild lives based on the foundations of respect and dignity. Sister Anne helps her students purge their negativity and find what is beautiful inside of them to express through art.

So she delved…the focus groups, the findings, the creative strategy, the process, the elements of execution. Her questions were intelligent, her comments insightful. No detail was too boring for Sister Anne, so I lavishly divulged the intricacies of the ad campaign that became somewhat of a spiritual journey for the team who nurtured and brought it to fruition.

We always hope our creative strategy will hit the mark and move our intended target – in this case, urban youth 18 – 25. And yes, we have metrics and that show progress city-wide. Inspiring Sister Anne, however, and providing even the most modest assistance in her mission is an added bonus of a much higher order.

MINDING OUR ELDERS

LevLane has a finely honed understanding of and respect for seniors. How could we not? We’ve been talking with them one-on-one for over 20 years in order to build brands that move them…literally. From Connecticut to Chicago, we’ve picked the brains of retirees, to understand what compels them to abandon an established lifestyle and start afresh in a senior living community. Such insights have never been more precious, now that a precarious economy provides a ready-made excuse to stay put on familiar ground. So we dig – for pearls that when strewn through the creative will help turn the heads and hearts of our prospects toward a wonderful new beginning. It’s gratifying work – to elicit the stories, soak in the wisdom, learn what really matters when you’re 70, 80, 90 years old. And, we get a glimpse of what we would hope to have when we get there ourselves: something of value to share, if someone happened to ask.

-Lori Miller, VP Creative Strategist

At Your Disposal

April 26, 2010
By Amanda Smith-Teutsch
City of Philadelphia uses street poets to convey anti-littering campaign

Instead of preaching on the wickedness of littering, leaders in the city of Philadelphia think they´ve hit on a new way to get people to think twice about tossing cigarette butts and soda bottles out the car window.

“Our challenge was to raise awareness of the city´s litter problem at the street level to effect change,” said Scott Tattar, of LevLane, the advertising firm conducting the anti-littering campaign for the city.

The campaign´s organizers started with a series of focus groups to see what kind of message would be best received by city residents, Tattar said.

“What we gleaned from that focus group is that people don´t want to be dictated to,” he said. “They wanted to be spoken to by their peers. They ¼didn´t want ´Big Government´ pointing the finger at them saying, ´You better not litter.´ ”

What resulted was the “Un Litter Us” campaign, which takes the spoken-word compositions of five Philadelphia street poets, accompanied by congas, acoustic bass or saxophone.

The artists — Denice Frohman, Gregory Corbin, Steve Annan, Whitney Peyton and Carlo Campbell — currently have radio spots and 30- and 60-second videos on YouTube, which also appear on Philadelphia television.

“The city has a heartbeat,” says Corbin in the first video on the YouTube channel. “With broken glass, cigarette butts, plastic wrappers clogging its arteries. The city has a heartbeat, with smokestack lungs, trash dancing on its tongue. The city has a heartbeat, and it´s waiting for you to provide hope, to become change, to become litter free. The city has a heartbeat, and it´s waiting for you to come clean.”

The five artists featured in the campaign were among 100 street poets who auditioned for the agency and were chosen for their sentiments and performances.

The campaign, which also includes transit posters, was the idea of Mayor Michael Nutter and his citywide neighborhood improvement initiatives, Tattar said.

The campaign also will include street poetry events, Facebook and Twitter presences, “Litter Free School Zones,” and block-by-block community mobilization drives.

“It has had a phenomenal reception in every corner of the city,” Tattar said. “The hip-hop community, the artists community, to the actual residents.”

Tattar said he credits the public announcements with increasing participation in the city´s spring cleanup program, nearly doubling participation from 120 to 234 neighborhood projects.

The appeal, he said, is the approach.

“Most public, government campaigns make the mistake of being preachy,” Tattar said. “This avoids that in every way. It´s real people speaking real words, and it eliminates the preachy potential.”

Philadelphia-based LevLane is a marketing communications agency whose clients include regional KFC/Taco Bell, Beneficial Bank, The Philadelphia Center City District and Reliance Standard Life Insurance.

To view the videos, visit www.youtube.com/user/unlitterusphilly.

Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Amanda Smith-Teutsch at 330-865-6166 or asmith-teutsch@crain.com